Displaying items by tag: NanoNumberland engineering consultancy for new processes, new materials. New processes: We analyse, optimize and document processes often not covered by quality management handbooks and teach them to run. We translate technical demands into physical effects or properties and then find the suitable material.http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/index.php/offers/itemlist/tag/Nano2016-06-24T03:18:57+02:00Joomla! - Open Source Content ManagementMagnetisation control by heat2016-01-16T20:59:30+01:002016-01-16T20:59:30+01:00http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/index.php/get-in-contact/item/1530-magnetisation-control-by-heatAdministratorgrond@numberland.de<div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/f0c3a021df8a28f4e3936660c10f3aba_S.jpg" alt="Magnetisation control by heat" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Magnetisation control by heat</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1601-06</p> <p>A laser-induced pulse of temperature could allow the control of the magnetisation in the nanoscale recording news of hard drives. This astonishing effect could lead to much denser magnetic memories, providing an unprecedented scale of capacity development. Over the last many years, the magnetic disk storage space thickness – the number of bits of information stored per unit area – doubles around every 18 months. This trend is expected to carry on, showing the fast rate of technical progress in this area. However, larger storage space capacities must go hand in hand with the ability to read and write bits at smaller size scales. The next generation of disk read-and-write heads will utilize temperature to record information and shop data assisted by nanoscale antennas energised by semiconductor lasers that operate at high temperatures. Against this backdrop, a task is developing asers that can be integrated with magnetic recording technology and creating antennae to supply and focus the power on a range of a couple of tens of nanometres that causes the material to be heated. This heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) approach will enable storage space densities of 1 terabit per square inch and beyond. So far, researchers have actually created innovative semiconductor lasers utilizing etching techniques to incorporate the laser mirror on a chip. Optimising the pattern transfer procedure ensures the smoothness of the mirror, ensuing in products with comparable performance to those perhaps not incorporated on a circuit. Venture work has also been geared to investigating unique methods for mirror protection with a focus on atomic layer deposition. The first reliability tests are underway. The laser wafer that comprises numerous layers of materials with varying optical and electric properties features been modelled using device simulators. The layer compositions and depth are optimised for high-temperature operation through detailed simulations. Based on these designs, scientists have effectively prepared and characterised a new laser structure that demonstrated excellent overall performance in terms of production power at high operating conditions. This breakthrough technology revolutionises data storage by further pushing current capacity limits permitting the scaling of data storage in the ‘cloud’. Improvements in the storage technology should assist advance all kinds of information administration.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Magnetisation</li><li>Control</li><li>Heat</li><li>Laser</li><li>Nano</li><li>Memory</li><li>circuit</li><ul></div><div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/f0c3a021df8a28f4e3936660c10f3aba_S.jpg" alt="Magnetisation control by heat" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Magnetisation control by heat</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1601-06</p> <p>A laser-induced pulse of temperature could allow the control of the magnetisation in the nanoscale recording news of hard drives. This astonishing effect could lead to much denser magnetic memories, providing an unprecedented scale of capacity development. Over the last many years, the magnetic disk storage space thickness – the number of bits of information stored per unit area – doubles around every 18 months. This trend is expected to carry on, showing the fast rate of technical progress in this area. However, larger storage space capacities must go hand in hand with the ability to read and write bits at smaller size scales. The next generation of disk read-and-write heads will utilize temperature to record information and shop data assisted by nanoscale antennas energised by semiconductor lasers that operate at high temperatures. Against this backdrop, a task is developing asers that can be integrated with magnetic recording technology and creating antennae to supply and focus the power on a range of a couple of tens of nanometres that causes the material to be heated. This heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) approach will enable storage space densities of 1 terabit per square inch and beyond. So far, researchers have actually created innovative semiconductor lasers utilizing etching techniques to incorporate the laser mirror on a chip. Optimising the pattern transfer procedure ensures the smoothness of the mirror, ensuing in products with comparable performance to those perhaps not incorporated on a circuit. Venture work has also been geared to investigating unique methods for mirror protection with a focus on atomic layer deposition. The first reliability tests are underway. The laser wafer that comprises numerous layers of materials with varying optical and electric properties features been modelled using device simulators. The layer compositions and depth are optimised for high-temperature operation through detailed simulations. Based on these designs, scientists have effectively prepared and characterised a new laser structure that demonstrated excellent overall performance in terms of production power at high operating conditions. This breakthrough technology revolutionises data storage by further pushing current capacity limits permitting the scaling of data storage in the ‘cloud’. Improvements in the storage technology should assist advance all kinds of information administration.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Magnetisation</li><li>Control</li><li>Heat</li><li>Laser</li><li>Nano</li><li>Memory</li><li>circuit</li><ul></div>Thin films with lesser defects2016-01-16T20:59:14+01:002016-01-16T20:59:14+01:00http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/index.php/get-in-contact/item/1527-thin-films-with-lesser-defectsAdministratorgrond@numberland.de<div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/68e3eaa9d829c459454ed745e7bf69f0_S.jpg" alt="Thin films with lesser defects" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Thin films with lesser defects</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1601-03</p> <p>Nano-scale slim films have become an important component of numerous products. Novel optical technology to detect and repair defects during production will improve quality and durability, and increase competitiveness. Tiny defects in slim movies utilized in items such as polymer-coated paper and low-cost, flexible photovoltaics (PVs) can decrease product quality and durability. This additionally decreases yield and increases scrap levels, more impacting competitiveness. Exposure of such defective PV modules and polymer-coated paperboard barrier movies to water vapour causes short circuits in electronics and the degradation of paper items. In-line quality control examination systems alleviate some of the burden, but there's frequently a trade-off between quality and speed. As a new task nears completion, experts have actually developed revolutionary optical strategies for existing optical measurement systems that detect smaller defects faster. Gas cleaning after examination has been introduced whereas cleaning and localised fix to eliminate particles produced during manufacturing will be introduced in the next phase. Laboratory tests have actually demonstrated a really promising decrease in problem densities of more than 90 %. One demonstrator and one proof-of-concept detection system have been implemented for each line. Ongoing trials are creating excellent results and the final demonstrators will showcase the new detection, cleaning and repair technologies. The technologies will be integrated with modern high-throughput roll-to-roll processing to increase production performance and decrease production expenses. Improved defect detection and fix will improve the quality and life time of products employing large-area thin movies, improving the competitive position of manufacturers. It'll also reduce waste, decrease costs and translate to crucial advantages for the environment. Brand new markets in smart packaging, flexible electronics and large-area lighting can be expected for the companion organizations.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Nano</li><li>Film</li><li>Defect</li><li>Optical</li><li>Quality</li><ul></div><div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/68e3eaa9d829c459454ed745e7bf69f0_S.jpg" alt="Thin films with lesser defects" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Thin films with lesser defects</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1601-03</p> <p>Nano-scale slim films have become an important component of numerous products. Novel optical technology to detect and repair defects during production will improve quality and durability, and increase competitiveness. Tiny defects in slim movies utilized in items such as polymer-coated paper and low-cost, flexible photovoltaics (PVs) can decrease product quality and durability. This additionally decreases yield and increases scrap levels, more impacting competitiveness. Exposure of such defective PV modules and polymer-coated paperboard barrier movies to water vapour causes short circuits in electronics and the degradation of paper items. In-line quality control examination systems alleviate some of the burden, but there's frequently a trade-off between quality and speed. As a new task nears completion, experts have actually developed revolutionary optical strategies for existing optical measurement systems that detect smaller defects faster. Gas cleaning after examination has been introduced whereas cleaning and localised fix to eliminate particles produced during manufacturing will be introduced in the next phase. Laboratory tests have actually demonstrated a really promising decrease in problem densities of more than 90 %. One demonstrator and one proof-of-concept detection system have been implemented for each line. Ongoing trials are creating excellent results and the final demonstrators will showcase the new detection, cleaning and repair technologies. The technologies will be integrated with modern high-throughput roll-to-roll processing to increase production performance and decrease production expenses. Improved defect detection and fix will improve the quality and life time of products employing large-area thin movies, improving the competitive position of manufacturers. It'll also reduce waste, decrease costs and translate to crucial advantages for the environment. Brand new markets in smart packaging, flexible electronics and large-area lighting can be expected for the companion organizations.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Nano</li><li>Film</li><li>Defect</li><li>Optical</li><li>Quality</li><ul></div>Nano materials for water purification2016-01-16T20:59:08+01:002016-01-16T20:59:08+01:00http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/index.php/get-in-contact/item/1526-nano-materials-for-water-purificationAdministratorgrond@numberland.de<div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/fce01341774186a17457104171b805ae_S.jpg" alt="Nano materials for water purification" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Nano materials for water purification</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1601-02</p> <p>Water scarcity is one of the main challenges of the twenty-first century. Novel low-cost, bio-based filtration and purification membranes promise increased access to clean water for all. Water use has been growing at two times the price of the populace during the last century. Every 12 months, competition for water resources for ingesting, washing, and sustaining farming and life intensifies. A new project is developing nanomaterials-based water purification membranes for decentralised commercial and domestic water therapy to help relieve the issue. Scientists are designing, developing and testing membrane-based prototypes based on nanocellulose and/or nanochitin, polysaccharides discovered in plants and the exoskeletons of crustaceans. The primary focus is on the removal of toxic chemical compounds such as heavy metal ions, pesticides and fertilisers from contaminated industrial water making use of membranes and membrane modules. The membranes will be evaluated for their suitability for disposal by composting and its effect on environment, at end-of-life. These bio-based functional membranes therefore offer an extremely energy-efficient, cheap, biodegradable, non-toxic and green substrate for water therapy. Using existing industrial processes, the team was able to quickly up-scale manufacturing of nanoparticles (cellulose and chitin nanocrystals and cellulose nanofibres) isolated from bioresources. Nanocellulose and nanochitin have demonstrated satisfactory adsorption of hefty metal ions from water for efficient water purification. Researchers prepared 100 % bio-based membranes from cellulose nanocrystals, cellulose nanofibres and chitin nanocrystals in indigenous type as well as from surface-modified cellulose nanocrystals. Various changes were tested to improve filtration, mechanical properties and adsorption efficiency. The project will assist to recover heavy metals while ensuring high-efficiency decentralised water cleansing, high adsorption prices and high adsorption selectivity. It will additionally feature reuseable antifouling or low fouling areas. The treatment of water toxins will have long-term benefits for individual health and quality of life. This work will lead to brand new products based on green nanotechnology in the form of nanomembranes, filters and adsorbents for water purification that will be much more efficient, cost effective and environment friendly than currently available items. They will offer sustainable solutions for water recycling and elimination, and the recovery of hefty steel ions, fertilisers, medications and pesticides from industrial effluents. The ensuing enhancement in the quality of surface and groundwater, at first in Europe and then at the worldwide level, will have a far-reaching effect on the environment.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Nano</li><li>Material</li><li>Water</li><li>Purification</li><li>Filtration</li><li>Membrane</li><ul></div><div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/fce01341774186a17457104171b805ae_S.jpg" alt="Nano materials for water purification" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Nano materials for water purification</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1601-02</p> <p>Water scarcity is one of the main challenges of the twenty-first century. Novel low-cost, bio-based filtration and purification membranes promise increased access to clean water for all. Water use has been growing at two times the price of the populace during the last century. Every 12 months, competition for water resources for ingesting, washing, and sustaining farming and life intensifies. A new project is developing nanomaterials-based water purification membranes for decentralised commercial and domestic water therapy to help relieve the issue. Scientists are designing, developing and testing membrane-based prototypes based on nanocellulose and/or nanochitin, polysaccharides discovered in plants and the exoskeletons of crustaceans. The primary focus is on the removal of toxic chemical compounds such as heavy metal ions, pesticides and fertilisers from contaminated industrial water making use of membranes and membrane modules. The membranes will be evaluated for their suitability for disposal by composting and its effect on environment, at end-of-life. These bio-based functional membranes therefore offer an extremely energy-efficient, cheap, biodegradable, non-toxic and green substrate for water therapy. Using existing industrial processes, the team was able to quickly up-scale manufacturing of nanoparticles (cellulose and chitin nanocrystals and cellulose nanofibres) isolated from bioresources. Nanocellulose and nanochitin have demonstrated satisfactory adsorption of hefty metal ions from water for efficient water purification. Researchers prepared 100 % bio-based membranes from cellulose nanocrystals, cellulose nanofibres and chitin nanocrystals in indigenous type as well as from surface-modified cellulose nanocrystals. Various changes were tested to improve filtration, mechanical properties and adsorption efficiency. The project will assist to recover heavy metals while ensuring high-efficiency decentralised water cleansing, high adsorption prices and high adsorption selectivity. It will additionally feature reuseable antifouling or low fouling areas. The treatment of water toxins will have long-term benefits for individual health and quality of life. This work will lead to brand new products based on green nanotechnology in the form of nanomembranes, filters and adsorbents for water purification that will be much more efficient, cost effective and environment friendly than currently available items. They will offer sustainable solutions for water recycling and elimination, and the recovery of hefty steel ions, fertilisers, medications and pesticides from industrial effluents. The ensuing enhancement in the quality of surface and groundwater, at first in Europe and then at the worldwide level, will have a far-reaching effect on the environment.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Nano</li><li>Material</li><li>Water</li><li>Purification</li><li>Filtration</li><li>Membrane</li><ul></div>Paper to conquer new markets2015-12-23T09:48:06+01:002015-12-23T09:48:06+01:00http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/index.php/get-in-contact/item/1521-paper-to-conquer-new-marketsAdministratorgrond@numberland.de<div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/8ee1622798ac660e50827ba8cec8c7ef_S.jpg" alt="Paper to conquer new markets" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Paper to conquer new markets</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1512-07</p> <p>A new project adopted a multidisciplinary approach, bringing together 12 research and industry lovers with various backgrounds, including materials science and engineering, chemistry, physics, electronic devices, and micro- and nanotechnologies. They envisioned paper items such as labels with particular autonomous properties that interact with users and/or report modifications in their environment. Work centred on developing new types of paper, fibres and inks on a commercial scale, as well as on new printable useful elements such as sensors, displays, memory modules and batteries. It's also developing a novel manufacturing process and printing technology, eventually resulting in large-area hybrid organic/inorganic papers with improved performance and expense effectiveness. After developing security labels, the group tested three reference papers for printability in relation to useful and peripheral elements. Hybrid circuits had been created by the group, with assessment showing both publishing and electrical integration performance. Industrial printing test runs were realised at a factory to move results of the work on the demonstrators, and an aesthetic assessment system had been installed and tested at the same center. Undertaking efforts pave the way for a renewal of the paper industry's products with more additional value functional products. Outcomes open up new options for paper and publishing industries in the growing market of low-cost and large value added printed electronics. The technology also features prospective for application in sectors related to general public safety (monitoring air poisoning and pollution), packaging (food quality during storage and transport), and chemical substances production and make use of.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>paper</li><li>Fiber</li><li>Nano</li><li>Technology</li><li>label</li><li>circuit</li><li>Electronics</li><ul></div><div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/8ee1622798ac660e50827ba8cec8c7ef_S.jpg" alt="Paper to conquer new markets" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Paper to conquer new markets</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1512-07</p> <p>A new project adopted a multidisciplinary approach, bringing together 12 research and industry lovers with various backgrounds, including materials science and engineering, chemistry, physics, electronic devices, and micro- and nanotechnologies. They envisioned paper items such as labels with particular autonomous properties that interact with users and/or report modifications in their environment. Work centred on developing new types of paper, fibres and inks on a commercial scale, as well as on new printable useful elements such as sensors, displays, memory modules and batteries. It's also developing a novel manufacturing process and printing technology, eventually resulting in large-area hybrid organic/inorganic papers with improved performance and expense effectiveness. After developing security labels, the group tested three reference papers for printability in relation to useful and peripheral elements. Hybrid circuits had been created by the group, with assessment showing both publishing and electrical integration performance. Industrial printing test runs were realised at a factory to move results of the work on the demonstrators, and an aesthetic assessment system had been installed and tested at the same center. Undertaking efforts pave the way for a renewal of the paper industry's products with more additional value functional products. Outcomes open up new options for paper and publishing industries in the growing market of low-cost and large value added printed electronics. The technology also features prospective for application in sectors related to general public safety (monitoring air poisoning and pollution), packaging (food quality during storage and transport), and chemical substances production and make use of.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>paper</li><li>Fiber</li><li>Nano</li><li>Technology</li><li>label</li><li>circuit</li><li>Electronics</li><ul></div>Fewer infections in hospitals2015-12-23T09:47:39+01:002015-12-23T09:47:39+01:00http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/index.php/get-in-contact/item/1516-fewer-infections-in-hospitalsAdministratorgrond@numberland.de<div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/dc4e2c5affa3554bafe24d1b3130414d_S.jpg" alt="Fewer infections in hospitals" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Fewer infections in hospitals</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1512-02</p> <p>One in 10 hospital customers are impacted by nosocomial infections. The outcome is an expansion of hospital stays by more than 10 million patient days per year in European countries alone. Impregnating hospital textiles, such as bedding and bandages, with antibacterial nanoparticles, would considerably decrease hospital-acquired infections, enhance client outcomes and save millions of euros. To attain this, a project expanded on a recently proven and patented single-step laboratory procedure.&nbsp; This involved impregnating the textiles with copper oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. Nanoparticle-coated materials had been tested and displayed effective anti-bacterial properties and great longevity. The pilot plants showed that this might be an effective method of creating textiles with strong anti-bacterial attributes. Scientists found that steel oxide nanoparticles can destroy both sensitive bacteria and germs that are resistant to antibiotics. To demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of antibacterial nanoparticles in a medical center environment. Earlier to this research, no chemical treatment for producing and impregnating textiles with antibacterial nanoparticles existed on an industrial scale. Many thanks to this task, antibacterial textiles will be manufactured by a one-step process that makes use of nanoparticles. This decreases production time and fibre damage, lowers production costs and utilizes an environmentally friendly water solution. Textile manufacturers today have all they require to move up commercialisation efforts.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>infection</li><li>textile</li><li>antibacterial</li><li>Nano</li><li>Particle</li><ul></div><div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/dc4e2c5affa3554bafe24d1b3130414d_S.jpg" alt="Fewer infections in hospitals" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Fewer infections in hospitals</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1512-02</p> <p>One in 10 hospital customers are impacted by nosocomial infections. The outcome is an expansion of hospital stays by more than 10 million patient days per year in European countries alone. Impregnating hospital textiles, such as bedding and bandages, with antibacterial nanoparticles, would considerably decrease hospital-acquired infections, enhance client outcomes and save millions of euros. To attain this, a project expanded on a recently proven and patented single-step laboratory procedure.&nbsp; This involved impregnating the textiles with copper oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. Nanoparticle-coated materials had been tested and displayed effective anti-bacterial properties and great longevity. The pilot plants showed that this might be an effective method of creating textiles with strong anti-bacterial attributes. Scientists found that steel oxide nanoparticles can destroy both sensitive bacteria and germs that are resistant to antibiotics. To demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of antibacterial nanoparticles in a medical center environment. Earlier to this research, no chemical treatment for producing and impregnating textiles with antibacterial nanoparticles existed on an industrial scale. Many thanks to this task, antibacterial textiles will be manufactured by a one-step process that makes use of nanoparticles. This decreases production time and fibre damage, lowers production costs and utilizes an environmentally friendly water solution. Textile manufacturers today have all they require to move up commercialisation efforts.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>infection</li><li>textile</li><li>antibacterial</li><li>Nano</li><li>Particle</li><ul></div>Execute chemical processes more eco-friendly2015-10-27T22:11:51+01:002015-10-27T22:11:51+01:00http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/index.php/get-in-contact/item/1513-execute-chemical-processes-more-eco-friendlyAdministratorgrond@numberland.de<div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/9d420ea9134f51f1b7d6e409defa19a0_S.jpg" alt="Execute chemical processes more eco-friendly" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Execute chemical processes more eco-friendly</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1510-09</p> <p>Experts have developed unique nano-structured catalysts and selective membrane materials for catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) of great importance to the power sector. They promise enhanced overall performance and sustainability at a lower price. CMRs combine membrane-based separation and a catalytic chemical reaction in one single device. More than 80 % of reactions in the chemical industry exploit catalysts to boost production price and yield. Process intensification allowing significantly less power usage and waste for more cost-effective and sustainable technologies could have tremendous impact on industry. A new project features selected four chemical processes particularly important in the power sector related to the production of pure hydrogen, liquid hydrocarbons and ethylene. The procedures are autothermal reforming (ATR), Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS), the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction and oxidative coupling of methane (OCM). In the at the same time the team features in its hands enhanced and more cost-effective catalysts and membranes for all four procedures. Those for the lab-scale studies have been delivered to lovers currently and the materials for the pilot-scale reactors have been selected. The final catalysts for each of the pilot-scale CMRs all demonstrate superior task, selectivity and stability compared to the current state of the art. Lab-scale CMRs for all four processes have been constructed and are in different phases of screening and demonstration. In specific, the FTS and WGS reactors have actually been shown and the oxygen membranes of the ATR and OCM reactors are currently being optimised. Pilot prototypes have been designed for all but the FTS CMR (see figure on module of WGS pilot). Design of the membranes, catalysts and CMRs was supported throughout the development process by modelling and simulation. Completion of the task will be accompanied by life-cycle and environmental analyses, the initial results of which have actually currently been obtained. The staff wants to guarantee safety against explosion. A risk assessment features been finished and safety recommendations proposed. Lastly, the staff features developed the framework for an upcoming socioeconomic analysis.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Chemical</li><li>Process</li><li>Catalyst</li><li>Nano</li><li>Membrane</li><li>Material</li><ul></div><div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/9d420ea9134f51f1b7d6e409defa19a0_S.jpg" alt="Execute chemical processes more eco-friendly" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Execute chemical processes more eco-friendly</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1510-09</p> <p>Experts have developed unique nano-structured catalysts and selective membrane materials for catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) of great importance to the power sector. They promise enhanced overall performance and sustainability at a lower price. CMRs combine membrane-based separation and a catalytic chemical reaction in one single device. More than 80 % of reactions in the chemical industry exploit catalysts to boost production price and yield. Process intensification allowing significantly less power usage and waste for more cost-effective and sustainable technologies could have tremendous impact on industry. A new project features selected four chemical processes particularly important in the power sector related to the production of pure hydrogen, liquid hydrocarbons and ethylene. The procedures are autothermal reforming (ATR), Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS), the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction and oxidative coupling of methane (OCM). In the at the same time the team features in its hands enhanced and more cost-effective catalysts and membranes for all four procedures. Those for the lab-scale studies have been delivered to lovers currently and the materials for the pilot-scale reactors have been selected. The final catalysts for each of the pilot-scale CMRs all demonstrate superior task, selectivity and stability compared to the current state of the art. Lab-scale CMRs for all four processes have been constructed and are in different phases of screening and demonstration. In specific, the FTS and WGS reactors have actually been shown and the oxygen membranes of the ATR and OCM reactors are currently being optimised. Pilot prototypes have been designed for all but the FTS CMR (see figure on module of WGS pilot). Design of the membranes, catalysts and CMRs was supported throughout the development process by modelling and simulation. Completion of the task will be accompanied by life-cycle and environmental analyses, the initial results of which have actually currently been obtained. The staff wants to guarantee safety against explosion. A risk assessment features been finished and safety recommendations proposed. Lastly, the staff features developed the framework for an upcoming socioeconomic analysis.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Chemical</li><li>Process</li><li>Catalyst</li><li>Nano</li><li>Membrane</li><li>Material</li><ul></div>Replacing silicon as an basic electronic material2015-10-27T22:11:46+01:002015-10-27T22:11:46+01:00http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/index.php/get-in-contact/item/1512-replacing-silicon-as-an-basic-electronic-materialAdministratorgrond@numberland.de<div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/b57af9b71eb22e9444b6a784bb199425_S.jpg" alt="Replacing silicon as an basic electronic material" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Replacing silicon as an basic electronic material</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1510-08</p> <p>Metal-oxide nanoparticles have actually electrical, magnetic and mechanical properties enabling the manufacturing of transparent devices through patterned deposition on versatile substrates at low temperatures. This might be the explanation why they are getting widespread interest as an enabling technology for next-generation electronic devices. To unlock their full potential, researchers adopted a holistic approach. Experimental research work on the synthesis of oxide materials suitable for display electronics and chemical sensing is supported by modelling of material properties. Material synthesis is focused on active semiconductor oxides and passive transparent performing oxides with binary, ternary and quaternary structures. Testing of oxide material electric properties is conducted using established methods along with the technique of four coefficients (M4C). M4C is based on dimensions of all coefficients regarding thermo-magneto-transport impacts of the specimens under evaluation — particularly, resistivity, Hall, Seebeck and Nernst coefficients. Developed during the program of the project, this brand new technique enables the characterisation of metal oxides with transportation characteristics below the Johnson sound level. The new oxide materials have a broad range of programs. The research work is, nevertheless, centred on touch screens with organic light-emitting diode arrays and brand new illumination and sensing concepts that are of interest to the automotive sector. Three prototypes have actually been developed collaboratively to show how newly created materials can be utilised in specific items. Early on in the project, an active matrix display overlaid on a versatile pressure sensor had been developed to take input from the motorist and provide comments. A 2nd prototype shows the possibility to integrate lighting into the practical coatings of house windows. Finally, a p-type sensor to monitor atmosphere quality in the cabin runs at lower temperatures than sensors available on the market.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Electronic</li><li>Material</li><li>Silicon</li><li>Nano</li><li>Particle</li><li>Transparent</li><li>Deposition</li><ul></div><div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/b57af9b71eb22e9444b6a784bb199425_S.jpg" alt="Replacing silicon as an basic electronic material" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Replacing silicon as an basic electronic material</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1510-08</p> <p>Metal-oxide nanoparticles have actually electrical, magnetic and mechanical properties enabling the manufacturing of transparent devices through patterned deposition on versatile substrates at low temperatures. This might be the explanation why they are getting widespread interest as an enabling technology for next-generation electronic devices. To unlock their full potential, researchers adopted a holistic approach. Experimental research work on the synthesis of oxide materials suitable for display electronics and chemical sensing is supported by modelling of material properties. Material synthesis is focused on active semiconductor oxides and passive transparent performing oxides with binary, ternary and quaternary structures. Testing of oxide material electric properties is conducted using established methods along with the technique of four coefficients (M4C). M4C is based on dimensions of all coefficients regarding thermo-magneto-transport impacts of the specimens under evaluation — particularly, resistivity, Hall, Seebeck and Nernst coefficients. Developed during the program of the project, this brand new technique enables the characterisation of metal oxides with transportation characteristics below the Johnson sound level. The new oxide materials have a broad range of programs. The research work is, nevertheless, centred on touch screens with organic light-emitting diode arrays and brand new illumination and sensing concepts that are of interest to the automotive sector. Three prototypes have actually been developed collaboratively to show how newly created materials can be utilised in specific items. Early on in the project, an active matrix display overlaid on a versatile pressure sensor had been developed to take input from the motorist and provide comments. A 2nd prototype shows the possibility to integrate lighting into the practical coatings of house windows. Finally, a p-type sensor to monitor atmosphere quality in the cabin runs at lower temperatures than sensors available on the market.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Electronic</li><li>Material</li><li>Silicon</li><li>Nano</li><li>Particle</li><li>Transparent</li><li>Deposition</li><ul></div>Nano technology for hydrogen storage2015-10-27T22:11:30+01:002015-10-27T22:11:30+01:00http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/index.php/get-in-contact/item/1509-nano-technology-for-hydrogen-storageAdministratorgrond@numberland.de<div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/e9ade54bcd41c186f40b423e5c4dc324_S.jpg" alt="Nano technology for hydrogen storage" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Nano technology for hydrogen storage</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1510-05</p> <p>One of the biggest hurdles for unveiling carbon-free vehicles that are driven by hydrogen stays finding a material capable of keeping enough hydrogen. Unfortunately, neither compressed hydrogen gasoline nor liquefied hydrogen is most likely to be capable of sufficient volumetric thickness. A new project created theoretical modelling, synthesis, characterisation and evaluation of novel nanocomposite materials for hydrogen storage space. It combined the newest developments in metal hydrides – compounds that bind hydrogen and launch it upon heating – with unique principles for tailoring material properties. Experimental work had been geared towards integrating metal hydride nanoparticles into nanocarbon templates that served as scaffolds to form nanocomposites. Cryo-infiltration had been one of the novel methods used for planning such composites. Researchers enhanced properties such as working temperature and stress, simplicity of reversibility of binding, and conversation between hydrides and the environment for improved security. Coating hydride nanoparticles into self-assembled polymer levels or encapsulating them in polymer shells provided stability and security against oxidation. NANOHY introduced advanced techniques such as inelastic or small-angle neutron scattering for investigating nano-confined systems. Experts demonstrated for the first time nanodispersion of complex hydrides into a microporous carbon scaffold. Magnesium hydride, amongst the best-studied metal hydrides, was shown to show modified thermodynamic properties when integrated into the porous carbon supports. Experts concluded that these thermodynamic effects are restricted to reversible hydrides and particles with sizes less than 2 nm. Finally, scientists successfully scaled up nano-confined hydrides and incorporated them into a laboratory test tank with promising results – a real breakthrough in the hard issue of hydrogen storage space for a hydrogen economy. The hydride nanoparticle demonstrated excellent cyclability, getting rid of the need for a catalyst. Twenty hydrogenation/dehydrogenation cycles had been performed. Except for hydrogen storage, other areas could benefit from this research, such as development of battery materials with greater storage capacities, better safety and improved cyclability. The task disseminated its findings in a number of magazines and at seminars and workshops.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Nano</li><li>Technology</li><li>Energy</li><li>Storage</li><li>Carbon</li><li>Hydrogen</li><ul></div><div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/e9ade54bcd41c186f40b423e5c4dc324_S.jpg" alt="Nano technology for hydrogen storage" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Nano technology for hydrogen storage</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1510-05</p> <p>One of the biggest hurdles for unveiling carbon-free vehicles that are driven by hydrogen stays finding a material capable of keeping enough hydrogen. Unfortunately, neither compressed hydrogen gasoline nor liquefied hydrogen is most likely to be capable of sufficient volumetric thickness. A new project created theoretical modelling, synthesis, characterisation and evaluation of novel nanocomposite materials for hydrogen storage space. It combined the newest developments in metal hydrides – compounds that bind hydrogen and launch it upon heating – with unique principles for tailoring material properties. Experimental work had been geared towards integrating metal hydride nanoparticles into nanocarbon templates that served as scaffolds to form nanocomposites. Cryo-infiltration had been one of the novel methods used for planning such composites. Researchers enhanced properties such as working temperature and stress, simplicity of reversibility of binding, and conversation between hydrides and the environment for improved security. Coating hydride nanoparticles into self-assembled polymer levels or encapsulating them in polymer shells provided stability and security against oxidation. NANOHY introduced advanced techniques such as inelastic or small-angle neutron scattering for investigating nano-confined systems. Experts demonstrated for the first time nanodispersion of complex hydrides into a microporous carbon scaffold. Magnesium hydride, amongst the best-studied metal hydrides, was shown to show modified thermodynamic properties when integrated into the porous carbon supports. Experts concluded that these thermodynamic effects are restricted to reversible hydrides and particles with sizes less than 2 nm. Finally, scientists successfully scaled up nano-confined hydrides and incorporated them into a laboratory test tank with promising results – a real breakthrough in the hard issue of hydrogen storage space for a hydrogen economy. The hydride nanoparticle demonstrated excellent cyclability, getting rid of the need for a catalyst. Twenty hydrogenation/dehydrogenation cycles had been performed. Except for hydrogen storage, other areas could benefit from this research, such as development of battery materials with greater storage capacities, better safety and improved cyclability. The task disseminated its findings in a number of magazines and at seminars and workshops.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Nano</li><li>Technology</li><li>Energy</li><li>Storage</li><li>Carbon</li><li>Hydrogen</li><ul></div>Nano Technology against Emissions2015-10-27T22:11:25+01:002015-10-27T22:11:25+01:00http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/index.php/get-in-contact/item/1508-nano-technology-against-emissionsAdministratorgrond@numberland.de<div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/0a4409fd7de9904a5f786d566e19e14d_S.jpg" alt="Nano Technology against Emissions" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Nano Technology against Emissions</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1510-04</p> <p>The usage of fossil fuels has developed a quantity of problems for which countries are intensively developing solutions to boost sustainability. All solutions require some type of separation and purification, which is currently achieved through primarily energy-intensive processes such as absorption, cryogenic separation and distillation. Polymer membranes are considered one of the absolute most energy-efficient methods for separating gases. However, many polymers either have actually low permeability or are not selective toward one gasoline over another. A project therefore developed novel polymers that effectively separate gas mixtures. The project looked at proper combinations of nanofillers with microcavities inside them that have actually well-defined size and porosity dispersed in advanced nanoporous polymers. Addition of nanofillers such as carbon nanotubes, zeolites, mesoporous oxides and metal-organic frameworks permitted increasing the polymer-free volume and creating preferential networks for mass transportation. Other than developing large amount polymers such as polynorbornenes, researchers also produced polymers of intrinsic microporosity. Such polymers are unable to pack effectively in the solid state and therefore trap enough free volume. Due to their contorted framework, they allow fast transport of tiny gas particles. Scientists developed a new polymerisation effect based on old chemistry – Tröger's base formation – that allowed them to prepare an extremely stiff polymer framework. Prospective programs of the technique should expand far beyond planning polymers just for gas separation membranes. Due to its extreme rigidity, the polymer functions as a molecular sieve, hindering transportation of larger gasoline molecules. To become an attractive alternative, pervaporation membranes need to be improved to become highly selective for ethanol over water. The task significantly improved understanding of fouling processes occurring at the membranes to enhance ethanol data recovery from fermentation broth. The project's innovative membrane layer technology should also offer an alternative to conventional processes for CO2 separation in energy stations. Despite their prospective, the polymer materials require to be scaled to enable further analysis of the separation procedure.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Nano</li><li>Technology</li><li>Emission</li><li>Fossil</li><li>Fuel</li><li>Energy</li><ul></div><div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/0a4409fd7de9904a5f786d566e19e14d_S.jpg" alt="Nano Technology against Emissions" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Nano Technology against Emissions</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1510-04</p> <p>The usage of fossil fuels has developed a quantity of problems for which countries are intensively developing solutions to boost sustainability. All solutions require some type of separation and purification, which is currently achieved through primarily energy-intensive processes such as absorption, cryogenic separation and distillation. Polymer membranes are considered one of the absolute most energy-efficient methods for separating gases. However, many polymers either have actually low permeability or are not selective toward one gasoline over another. A project therefore developed novel polymers that effectively separate gas mixtures. The project looked at proper combinations of nanofillers with microcavities inside them that have actually well-defined size and porosity dispersed in advanced nanoporous polymers. Addition of nanofillers such as carbon nanotubes, zeolites, mesoporous oxides and metal-organic frameworks permitted increasing the polymer-free volume and creating preferential networks for mass transportation. Other than developing large amount polymers such as polynorbornenes, researchers also produced polymers of intrinsic microporosity. Such polymers are unable to pack effectively in the solid state and therefore trap enough free volume. Due to their contorted framework, they allow fast transport of tiny gas particles. Scientists developed a new polymerisation effect based on old chemistry – Tröger's base formation – that allowed them to prepare an extremely stiff polymer framework. Prospective programs of the technique should expand far beyond planning polymers just for gas separation membranes. Due to its extreme rigidity, the polymer functions as a molecular sieve, hindering transportation of larger gasoline molecules. To become an attractive alternative, pervaporation membranes need to be improved to become highly selective for ethanol over water. The task significantly improved understanding of fouling processes occurring at the membranes to enhance ethanol data recovery from fermentation broth. The project's innovative membrane layer technology should also offer an alternative to conventional processes for CO2 separation in energy stations. Despite their prospective, the polymer materials require to be scaled to enable further analysis of the separation procedure.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Nano</li><li>Technology</li><li>Emission</li><li>Fossil</li><li>Fuel</li><li>Energy</li><ul></div>Nanomaterials for health2015-09-28T09:33:10+02:002015-09-28T09:33:10+02:00http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/index.php/get-in-contact/item/1502-nanomaterials-for-healthAdministratorgrond@numberland.de<div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/d9ea853b1f81f1e599553bf1603f446c_S.jpg" alt="Nanomaterials for health" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Nanomaterials for health</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1509-08</p> <p>A consortium is creating innovative steel oxide nanocomposite materials that have a wide range of applications. These range from assisting the delivery of drugs to helping cleanse up the natural environment. Core-shell materials, where nanoparticles of a particular element are covered with another substance, can have many programs in nanotechnology and nanomedicine. An initiative has developed a procedure for applying unique proteins from marine organisms to nanoparticles to produce core-shell materials. The project investigated the application of marine metal-oxide-forming enzymes and multicopper oxidase (MCO) enzymes from marine germs. It also concentrated on a type of laccase enzyme derived from marine sponges, that can be used to produce steel oxide nanocomposite materials. Project partners immobilised a sponge laccase on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles . In addition, the enzyme can be used together with silica or other steel-oxide-forming proteins to render nanoparticles containing multiple shells of metal oxides such as titania. The photocatalytic and ferromagnetic properties of the titania-iron oxide nanoparticles allowed the development of a technique for fast and efficient removal of bacteria applying a novel magnetic nanoparticle separator. Core-shell nanoparticles developed by the consortium will be used in the remediation of contaminated sites by the removal of germs and hefty metals. The nanoparticles can additionally be utilized for developing anti-fouling strategies.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Nano</li><li>Material</li><li>Composite</li><li>Particle</li><li>Health</li><li>Environment</li><ul></div><div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.tech-no-log-ic.com/media/k2/items/cache/d9ea853b1f81f1e599553bf1603f446c_S.jpg" alt="Nanomaterials for health" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Nanomaterials for health</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1509-08</p> <p>A consortium is creating innovative steel oxide nanocomposite materials that have a wide range of applications. These range from assisting the delivery of drugs to helping cleanse up the natural environment. Core-shell materials, where nanoparticles of a particular element are covered with another substance, can have many programs in nanotechnology and nanomedicine. An initiative has developed a procedure for applying unique proteins from marine organisms to nanoparticles to produce core-shell materials. The project investigated the application of marine metal-oxide-forming enzymes and multicopper oxidase (MCO) enzymes from marine germs. It also concentrated on a type of laccase enzyme derived from marine sponges, that can be used to produce steel oxide nanocomposite materials. Project partners immobilised a sponge laccase on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles . In addition, the enzyme can be used together with silica or other steel-oxide-forming proteins to render nanoparticles containing multiple shells of metal oxides such as titania. The photocatalytic and ferromagnetic properties of the titania-iron oxide nanoparticles allowed the development of a technique for fast and efficient removal of bacteria applying a novel magnetic nanoparticle separator. Core-shell nanoparticles developed by the consortium will be used in the remediation of contaminated sites by the removal of germs and hefty metals. The nanoparticles can additionally be utilized for developing anti-fouling strategies.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Nano</li><li>Material</li><li>Composite</li><li>Particle</li><li>Health</li><li>Environment</li><ul></div>